Fashion


Each new product from Rose Inc seems to get better and better—the formulas not only are boosted with good-for-your-skin ingredients but also feature really innovative technology. (Just read on about the brand’s skin tint and moisturizer for proof.) That said, as with most things in life, high-quality products come with deservedly higher price points, so while Rose Inc’s assortment of skincare and makeup products is fairly spendy, it’s definitely worth the plunge.

But this is where the good news comes in: Rose Inc’s Friends & Family Sale is officially on, and now through Tuesday, June 28, you can score 25% off sitewide, no code needed, and with the only exclusions being the brand’s sets. If you need some inspiration as to where to start, Rosie HW herself is sharing her top five product picks below, and we’re following suit with our editor-approved recs right after. Keep scrolling! The best products to shop for during Rose Inc’s Friends & Family Sale are just below. 


Photography by George Pimentel Photography

The start of Toronto Pride, a colourful dress code and all you can eat desserts were the perfect ingredients to celebrate the launch of FASHION’s summer issue.

At FASHION’s Cake Mix party held June 9 at Space on King, the dessert references hit as soon as one stepped into the gallery-like venue.  Guests were met with a larger-than-life cake slice sculpture, melting “icing” decals offered the perfect photo backdrop, and upstairs an OGX-branded wall of candy floss provided a sugary treat.

Held to celebrate the release of FASHION’s Summer 2022 issue starring Symone, and the beginning of Toronto Pride, Cake Mix brought together the city’s stylish glitterati, the LGBTQIA2S+ community and cake lovers of all kinds. The event was also a fundraiser for the Rainbow Railroad, with a live auction for a painting by Terran McNeely.

Entertainment and edibles included petite red velvet pancakes, a tarot card reading session, an impromptu blowout (thank you Chatters Hair Salon!), and an energetic performance by Juno-nominated artist Ceréna. And maybe it was just the fragrance from all the food, but the air in the room somehow seemed sweeter.

Photography by George Pimentel Photography

Guests were encouraged to dress colourfully with Valentino pink the most popular hue. Neon was another favourite, most decadently worn by Miss Moco during her performance on the BOSS stage, alongside DJ Karim Olen Ash. However, the best-dressed award of the night goes to the influencer, model and activist Myles Sexton. Posing for pix in the Jean Paul Gaultier room, they wore a dress screen printed with a naked woman’s body by the designer.

See the Gaultier gown, sourced from SSENSE, in the gallery below where we’ve rounded up all the most memorable looks from FASHION’s Cake Mix party.

Special thanks to the following:

Jean Paul Gaultier, BOSS, OGX, Chatters, Bayview Village, Sugar Moon Salon, MAC, Space on King, Gato Negro Wine, Green Owl Vodka, Perrier, Rainbow Railroad, Terran McNeely, Ceréna, Miss Moco, Myles Sexton, Karim Olen Ash.


The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have embarked on an eight-day royal tour of the Caribbean, which will include stops in Belize, Jamaica, and the Bahamas. On Sunday, Prince William and Kate Middleton paid a visit to the small Belizean town of Hopkins. For the excursion, Middleton wore a royal blue dress by Tory Burch, which echoed the colors of Belize’s flag. 

For a walk on the beach to meet with marine conservationists, Middleton changed out of her platform wedges into espadrille flats by Stella McCartney. We rarely see the duchess wearing flats (that aren’t sneakers), so her shoe choice immediately piqued my interest. As it happens, another infamous heel lover, Anna Wintour, also wears white espadrille flats when she wants a break from stilettos. Scroll down to see how both women style the same trend, and see every outfit from Kate Middleton’s new royal tour. 


Photography courtesy of Tommy Hilfiger

Including swimwear drops from Hilary MacMillan and Jimmy Choo, plus a closer peek at the Adidas x Gucci collection.

Tommy Hilfiger and Shawn Mendes team up

Photography courtesy of Tommy Hilfiger

When Shawn Mendes pulled up to the Met Gala earlier this month in an upcycled Tommy Hilfiger getup, he was likely foreshadowing his multifaceted collaboration with the American brand. This week, Tommy Hilfiger and Shawn Mendes officially revealed their partnership, Play it Forward, as a next step in the brand’s evolution and sustainability journey.

To kick off, the Canadian singer-songwriter is fronting the Summer 2022 “Classics Reborn” campaign, a collection made of sustainable material. Mendes will also sport custom sustainable Tommy styles throughout his upcoming world tour while the brand donates USD$1 million to mitigate and offset the environmental impacts of the tour. What’s more, Mendes will dabble in design as the partnership culminates next spring with a co-designed, circular capsule.

Jimmy Choo brings glamour to pools and beaches

Jimmy Choo Beach capsule
Photography courtesy of Jimmy Choo

Jimmy Choo dreamed up a capsule collection of footwear, accessories and swimwear for a simple yet glamorous summer. The signature JC monogram fixates on tote bags, towels and swimsuits while the exaggerated-sole on the Diamond Flipflop sandals burst in a colour range of yellow, white and Malibu blue. “This summer capsule is about simple pleasures,” said Creative Director Sandra Choi in a press release. “Something we can all relate to, something we all yearn for.”

Hilary MacMillan expands into swim

Hilary MacMillan swim
Photography courtesy of Joe Bulawan

Canada’s Drag Race winner Priyanka is the first drag queen to front a swim campaign, and it’s for none other than Hilary MacMillan’s inaugural assortment of swimwear. The expansion into the new category was developed as a celebration of authenticity, diversity and inclusivity — all core values for the brand — featuring six women’s suits, three cover-ups and a limited-edition offering of men’s swim trunks. The latter is specifically notable given that the Canadian designer has never been in the menswear space. Featuring bold, pop-art prints, this buoyant drop is for anyone who loves to stand out from the crowd.

Toronto’s Bata Shoe Museum has a new, ultra futuristic exhibit

Photography courtesy of Kailee Mandel

In 2022, shoes are a coveted pillar in most fashion lovers’ wardrobes, and sneaker culture is booming. Fittingly, Toronto’s infamous Bata Shoe Museum is assessing this subculture with its newest exhibition, Future Now: Virtual Sneakers to Cutting-Edge Kicks. The show, opening May 26, explores how vanguard technologies, materials and ideas are reimagining modern day footwear. Expect to see the auto-lacing Nike MAGs (hello, Back to the Future Part II), digitally designed 3D-printed shoes, footwear created for the metaverse and more mind-blowing designs.

Drew House launches at Ssense

Photography courtesy of Ssense

This week, Justin Bieber and Ryan Good’s gender-neutral brand Drew House officially launched with Ssense in store and online. Partnering with a global wholesale platform is a first for Drew House, as they’ve previously only sold their streetwear through the brand’s home site. Thanks to the iconic smiley face logo and bright colour palette, the range of clothing and accessories for adults, kids and pets sparks a positive and blissful mood.

Uniqlo Canada launches new JW Anderson collaboration

Photography courtesy of Uniqlo

Uniqlo’s latest collaboration with JW Anderson arrives in the form of a Spring/Summer 2022 collection. Inspired by Britain’s sailing and seaside culture, the capsule combines the expert craftsmanship of both brands with loads of colour, nautical motifs and water resilient fabrics.

Adidas x Gucci is almost here

Photography courtesy of Carlijn Jacobs

First seen in the Exquisite Gucci fashion show in February, the high fashion-athleticwear crossover of Gucci and Adidas has been further revealed in a new lookbook. Ahead of the June 7 collection launch, fashion fans are given a close look at Creative Director Alessandro Michele’s designs, which merge emblems from the Italian fashion House with those of the iconic sports brand. Swathed in a kaleidoscope of colours and geometric prints, the creations are intrinsically rule free.

TMU’s Fashion Zone is hosting a sustainability challenge

The Fashion Zone at Toronto Metropolitan University (formerly Ryerson University) is calling all GTA-based designers for a fashion sustainability challenge. The Consulate General of India has partnered with the Fashion Zone for this, and will give 10 designers the opportunity to design a garment using sustainable Indian textiles. The finalists will present their designs at a prestigious fashion show this August for a chance to win $5,000 and a free year of incubation at the Fashion Zone. Applications for the competition are open now until June 1, 2022.

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Nothing puts me in a joyful mood quite like a feel-good printed dress. It livens up my look in an instant and requires minimal accessories and thought. Moreover, they’re ideal for when you want to look like you made an effort (with zero effort actually required). 

Whether you opt for statement florals, trending psychedelic prints, or runway-approved rainbow stripes, this season there are plenty of pretty patterns to get your hands on for the warm weather ahead. Today, I wanted to share some of my absolute favorite printed frocks on the market right now that I can’t stop thinking about along with the best shoes to wear with each one. How’s that for a no-brainer outfit?

There’s a little something for every taste and budget, so whether you’re headed to the beach or brunch, keep scrolling for some winning dress-and-shoe outfit combos that I guarantee will garner all the compliments.


Photography by BY MAY TRUONG

He’s painting the town red (and every other shade of the rainbow).

Like so many on the journey to discovering their creative purpose, Armand Digdoyo, it seems, has already lived several lives. Growing up in Ottawa after his parents emigrated from Jakarta, he eventually moved to Montreal to explore city life as a club kid and assist local fashion designer Lino Catalano before finally landing in Toronto. For the past 18 years, he has continued to try on many hats in an attempt to make the most of his creative savvy. He was a member of electro-dance group Fritz Helder & The Phantoms (which opened for Lady Gaga in NYC and was a mentee of Nelly Furtado’s), a columnist for Fab magazine, a DJ for the Canadian Opera Company and Holt Renfrew and a sound designer and stylist for brands such as Aveda, Deveaux New York and Greta Constantine. He also founded New Ho Queen to support local LGBTQIA2S+-identifying Asians in the face of racially targeted hate crimes.

Six years ago, his experience in fashion, music and entertainment intersected in a way that makes one feel that life’s dots eventually all connect. Along with his friend and fellow DJ Phil Villeneuve, he co-founded Yohomo — a hub and safe space for the LGBTQIA2S+ community to come together and share information on pre-vetted art, culture and nightlife events. “Yohomo came from the #nohomo hashtag trending on Twitter at one point,” says Digdoyo. “We wanted to reclaim it and turn something so homophobic into something positive.”

Digdoyo and Villeneuve have since branched into producing their own Yohomo events, podcast and curated playlists as well as a collaboration with Spotify during Pride, which landed them on a billboard in the middle of Yonge-Dundas Square. They’ve also introduced a line of custom Yohomo merchandise, often designed in partnership with local artists, including T-shirts, sweatshirts and reusable grocery bags, which they print in limited batches in Toronto and ship without tags in compostable mailers in order to avoid as much waste as possible. Expanding the Yohomo model beyond events has also helped them keep the party and community support going virtually during the pandemic. “I think these queer experiences that turn themselves into art really need to be highlighted, especially because of the mindfulness it creates,” says Digdoyo. “It inspires young people to know they can thrive.” During the initial lockdown of 2020, they collaborated with designer Tim Singleton and donated five dollars from the sale of every shirt to The 519 — a major LGBTQIA2S+ support and activist centre in downtown Toronto. Since then, they’ve continued to raise proceeds for multiple community groups, including LGBT Youthline, Pieces to Pathways and FoodShare.

Like for many of us, Digdoyo’s goal with makeup is simply to present the best possible version of himself. Looking more polished for special events is a must, he says, as is appearing in the obligatory snapshot and IG Live. “I’m turning 40 this year, so I want to feel like I look a little younger and well rested.” To help achieve this, a little well-placed MAC Studio Finish SPF 35 Concealer and Charlotte Tilbury Airbrush Flawless Finish setting powder as well as filled-in brows go a long way. “I try not to go too dark with my brows because I want to keep them in balance with my beard,” he adds.

Digdoyo says that after experimenting so much with dynamic, drag-inspired looks when he was a member of Fritz Helder & The Phantoms, he went through a phase in which he wanted to keep his appearance as pared down as possible. However, the restrictions and isolation of the past couple of years have inspired him to bring back some of those styles and techniques, such as dramatic lashes and other facial embellishments, in an effort to have more fun and take everything a little less seriously. Digdoyo especially appreciates how social media and beauty influencers have made various beauty looks more accessible to everyone, regardless of gender norms. “You can play to how you feel, and you don’t have to put yourself in any box,” he says. “It’s really encouraging to see how non-binary and trans folks are expressing themselves while also achieving a lot of success.”

One influencer who has been a particular inspiration is Bretman Rock, a Filipino-American living in Hawaii who posts beauty and lifestyle videos for his more than 18 million followers on Instagram and nearly nine million YouTube subscribers. After friend and fashion photographer Tommy Ton pointed Rock out, Digdoyo admitted he became hooked on the influencer’s authentic point of view and how he uniquely represents fashion- and beauty-loving queer culture. “I wish I had seen somebody like that when I was growing up as a gay Asian kid. Maybe I wouldn’t have put so many restrictions and insecurities on myself in terms of how I wanted to look or dress or how I felt I had to present myself as a queer person.”

While Digdoyo’s mother’s love of fashion and beauty was an early source of encouragement for his own passions, growing up in a Muslim family also helped inform his perspective on building safe spaces and encouraging all forms of expression and representation. “It has helped me know what it’s like to be an outsider within a group of outsiders and allowed me to be mindful of how people can feel marginalized at different intersections,” says Digdoyo. “It has definitely affected my drive to create community where I don’t see it because I know how hard it can be to feel not included and not seen.”

This article first appeared in FASHION’s April issue. Find out more here

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I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: I’m a really good Nordstrom shopper. There’s something so soothing to me about scrolling through all the pages of new arrivals with the intention of singling out the best of the best for all of you. It’s here I spot some of the best products before anyone else simply because I’m willing to take the time to go through it all. Sometimes we like to highlight the best basics, newest trends, and so on and so forth, but today, I am here to bring you the best (and cheapest) items I’m freaking over thanks to the Nordstrom sale. 

All Nordstrom fans know that once a seasonal sale comes around, all bets are off. Prices get knocked down left and right and if you’re not careful, you could end up with a cart so full you can’t handle it. I am the first person to justify any high-priced sale item, but today, I want to bring all the under-$50 pieces that Nordstrom is truly treating us with. A new sweatsuit? They’ve got it. A trendy new top? You’ll find it here. Basically, if you’re just in the mood to do a little harmless retail therapy, this affordable selection from the Nordstrom sale will have you smiling ear to ear. 


Photography courtesy of Getty Images

At the 2022 Oscars, Zendaya, Kristen Stewart and Wanda Sykes all channelled rule-breaking style with the simple garment.

Oscars night is the pinnacle of red carpet fashion. It’s where the glitz and glamour of Hollywood is on full display as celebrities dress up in custom designs and haute couture. But sometimes the simplest style choices are the most memorable. Such was the case at this year’s Oscars, when the humble white button-up shirt made its return to the red carpet — most memorably on Zendaya.

The Dune star wore a custom Valentino ensemble that was comprised of a white satin cropped blouse and a sequinned silver skirt that trailed behind her. The look was seemingly an homage to one of the most memorable Oscars get-ups of all time: Sharon Stone’s outfit in 1998.

At the 70th Academy Awards, Stone caused a stir when she arrived in a white dress shirt from Gap. The oversized blouse was unbuttoned to the waist, had rolled up sleeves and was casually tucked into her ruched satin Vera Wang skirt. (Two years prior, she wore a Gap turtleneck with an Armani tuxedo jacket to the Oscars after a delivery mishap ruined her plans for a custom outfit.)

At the time, tabloids criticized her, calling the look inappropriate for such an event, but it’s since gone down as one of the greatest red carpet looks of all time. The outfit completely rewrote red carpet rules by blending masculine and feminine, and designer brands with high-street fashion.

Fast forward 24 years to the 94th Academy Awards, and Zendaya wasn’t the only celebrity to embrace the button-up. Comedian Wanda Sykes, one of the night’s emcees, walked the red carpet in a crisp white tuxedo by Sergio Hudson. A white top with shimmering crystal buttons offered a dressed up take on the everyday classic.

Actor Uma Thurman channelled her iconic character Mia Wallace from 1994’s Pulp Fiction at the Oscars in a silk white button-up shirt. Wallace’s costuming — a blunt bob, bangs and a white dress shirt — remains a classic style reference, thanks in part to its simplicity. Thurman paired the blouse with a floor-length black silk skirt by Bottega Veneta. Are you seeing the pattern here?

Kristen Stewart also threw out the proverbial red carpet rulebook by wearing a pantsuit, sans pants. The actor, nominated for her portrayal as Princess Diana in Spencer, wore a custom Chanel suit with a pair of satin mini —dare we say micro mini— shorts. Under her tailored jacket was a white dress shirt with only one button fastened at the bottom. The look complemented that of her date and fiancé Dylan Meyer, who had her own subversive take on the shirt with only two clasps fastened at the top. From leaving her blouse unbuttoned to being the first person to wear “hot pants” to the Academy Awards, Stewart’s gender-defying look was one for the history books.

Rigid wardrobe expectations have always existed at the Oscars, especially for women. When the awards were first televised in 1953, Academy instructions requested that women did not show cleavage. In 1968, Oscars costume supervisor Edith Head sent out a letter asking that female guests wear “formal evening gowns either maxi or floor length, preferably pastel shades.” Even ahead of 2021’s scaled-back event, producers of the show released dress code regulations urging guests to steer clear of casualwear.

The white blouse itself has also come a long way in women’s fashion, from being seen on queen Marie Antoinette in the 18th century to its introduction into women’s fashion in the early 1920s. But ultimately, we have Sharon Stone to thank for making it red-carpet appropriate.

Over the years, women have uniquely incorporated the simple garment into red carpet looks. In 2004, Diane Keaton wore a white top and Ralph Lauren coat to the Academy Awards. And in 2013, Julia Roberts layered a white button-down under a black Dolce & Gabbana gown at the Golden Globes. But the 2022 Oscars was an evening of white button-up representation like never before.

As gender-defying dressing becomes a staple of modern fashion, dress codes are increasingly difficult to enforce — even for an event as prestigious as the Oscars. And that’s a good thing. In an era when runway looks are meticulously recreated on celebrities, it can feel like red carpets lack originality. But the humble white shirt, styled completely differently by four stars, shows versatility, uniqueness, and a new era of rule-breaking style at the Oscars.

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If you want to smell fresh and cheerful—whether it’s April or the dead of winter—you can always opt for a spring-inspired fragrance. These scents evoke sunshine, happiness, and nature. I’m talking notes like florals, citrus, and greenery. And they’ll probably put a smile on your face.

One brand that totally wins in that fragrance department? Escada. I swear every perfume from the brand is a sweet little burst of springtime. Its perfumes have notes of pear, raspberry, jasmine, rose, blackcurrant, and more (all of the most delicious and pleasant scents).

So if you’re looking for a new signature fragrance to spritz on this spring (or any time of year, really), take a look at some Escada scents below.


Photo courtesy of Virginia Johnson.

Finds across fashion, beauty and decor.

International Women’s Day is right around the corner, and what better way to to mark the occasion than by supporting women-owned brands?

With its origins as a socialist movement in the early 1900s, IWD is a celebration of the cultural, political, and socioeconomic achievements of women. This year’s theme, “Break the Bias,” calls on us all to “imagine a gender equal world.” In Canada and internationally, this dream can feel out of reach. From the abortion ban in Texas to the crisis in Ukraine that threatens the rights of LGBTQ+ people, playing an active role to create “a world free of bias, stereotypes, and discrimination,” per IWD, is more important than ever.

And so in honour of International Women’s Day, we’re spotlighting women-owned brands that you can support now. From clothing and accessories to beauty and home decor, these businesses are making their mark. Flip through the gallery below to shop.

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